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DIY Tomato Supports

Tomatoes are one of several crops that are best grown in your own garden. The homegrown flavors tomato trellis supportsof picked-when-ripe, fresh tomatoes, snap beans, peas, or corn are worth the effort. This year I tried a new support system with my tomatoes, and so far it is my favorite because it is easy to set up, use, and store. And it's reusable year after year!

My new method is similar to the stake-and-weave method, but it's easier. I used sturdy wire mesh panels (concrete remesh or hog panels work well) attached to 8' fencing t-posts. I hung the mesh with the bottom about 1' above the ground and attached it to t-posts using zip-ties. I planted my tomatoes 2' apart in line with the support. While I am in the garden, I can simply weave the tomato tops back and forth through the grid pattern. I do this once a week, maybe twice, while I scout for ripe tomatoes, pests, and disease. At the end of the season, I can simply remove frost-killed vegetation, snip the zip ties, pull the t-posts and store the panels and t-posts flat, outdoors, for years of use. These are also great for creating permanent trellises rotating between peas, pole beans, melons, watermelon, cucumbers or any other climbers. I love seeing my tall, thin, yet strong wall of tomatoes. This system is simple, space efficient, reusable, and keeps plants off the ground, improving airflow and reducing the risk of soilborne diseases. It helps make weeding a snap!

Every year my gardening efforts open my eyes to new opportunities and ideas to improve colors, flavors, and methods—my skills and enjoyment grow right alongside it.



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DIY Tomato Supports Comments

7 comments

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5 out of 5 stars Feb 18, 2020
I've used tomato cages, Florida weave and tomato stakes and am still looking for a better method. This looks like a fast and easy way of supporting tomatoes. I used cattle fencing to trellis cucumbers last year and it worked good. I'm going to try this method for my tomatoes this year.
Debbie from MS

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5 out of 5 stars Feb 18, 2020
Sounds great but it would help if you could explain some of the terms you use in this sentence: "sturdy wire mesh panels (concrete remesh or hog panels work well) attached to 8' fencing t-posts." I do not know what wire mesh panels (or the examples) are and I do not know what "t-posts" are.
Lewis from MA
Owner Response: Hi Lewis, Thanks for the question. Remesh is a cheaper option than cattle or hog fence panels, but it is not as sturdy and will rust. Remesh is a flat, metal grid panel used to stabilize concrete and can be found in the concrete section of a hardware store. The images might be helpful for a visual representation. Hog or cattle panels are fencing panels used in livestock operations and for general fencing and look similar to remesh but are sturdier, rust-proof, and also more expensive. T-posts are posts that are driven into the ground vertically to support fencing. T-posts are straight, often green, and have a spade shape at the bottom which helps to anchor them into the ground. They can also be found in the fencing section of a hardware store.

Blog Title

5 out of 5 stars Jul 22, 2020
Get 1"x2" x 8 feet wood stakes and drive them in at least a foot. Make notches in wood as needed to hold up ties. This method necessitates at least weekly visits to plants to bundle the spread and tie up the plant due to the increasing weight from tomatoes. I stain my stakes - just to make my wife happy, but it does look nice. Indeterminate tomatoes need this 8 foot stake, but shorter ones can be used for determinate varieties.
Frank Hochman from CA

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5 out of 5 stars Jul 23, 2020
Great idea! Do you have a photo?
Cindy from NY

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5 out of 5 stars Jul 24, 2020
I use the eight foot handy fences from local feed store, I use 3/4 rebar by 8 feet long and that has a 6" 3/4" piece of rebar welded in "Y" type postion, so I just hang the handy fence. been doing this 3 years now. I am lucky my husband welds.
SARA HILL from VA

Blog Title

5 out of 5 stars Mar 28, 2021
I agree with some of the other comments! Pictures or video would be super helpful!
marcie from CA
Owner Response: Hi Marcie, Thanks for the feedback, we will look into putting something together. Happy gardening!

Blog Title

5 out of 5 stars May 14, 2021
I have 4x8ft raised beds. The cattle panels I bought at Tractor Supply Co & were 50in x 16ft. I put t post next to the wood of bed. Then took the panels & arched it over to the bed next to the 1st bed. It makes an arch not only for vining fruit & can also plant an evergreen vine so you have a pretty arch to walk under & supports the tomatoes, squash, melons ect. I have a second bed at end of first so I use 2 panels & have a longer archway. Being Deep South my season is longer but a firepit in the yard makes being back there very relaxing in cool weather & a paradise for bees, butterflies & birds. I have some fruit trees & 4x4 wildflower beds so my yard is basically an edible garden. Look up the cow panels on TSC web site to see what they look like. I highly recommend this method. Panels are around $25 & T posts around $5.
Michelle from LA