Dirani Summer Squash Seeds

#0250
This packet sows up to 6 mounds.
Availability: In Stock
This squash is perfect for the popular, Middle Eastern stuffed squash dish, Koosa (recipe inside packet). You'll love 'Dirani' because of the plant's compact habit and continuous production of fruits to enjoy all summer. Large leaves provide excellent coverage to protect fruits. Harvest when small for fresh use or allow them to grow larger for stuffing and baking. Use in any recipe calling for zucchini.
$2.49 12 seeds

Botanical Name: Cucurbita pepo (hybrid)

Days to Maturity: 50 days

Family: Cucurbitaceae

Native: North America

Hardiness: Frost-sensitive annual

Plant Dimensions: Bushy and compact, 36" wide

Variety Information: Best picked at 6"–7" long, light greenish-white with speckles

Type: Bush

Attributes: Good for Containers

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED. 1 to 2 weeks after your average last frost date, and when soil temperature is 70°–85°F.

When to Start Inside: Not recommended except in very short growing seasons, 2 to 4 weeks before transplanting. Roots are sensitive to disturbance; sow in biodegradable pots that can be planted directly into the ground. Transplant when soil temperature is at least 60°F.

Days to Emerge: 5–10 days

Seed Depth: ½"–1"

Seed Spacing: 2–3 seeds per mound

Row Spacing: 3'–4'

Thinning: When 3 leaves, thin to 1 plant per mound

Harvesting: Harvest frequently to increase yield; squash seem to get monstrous overnight. While edible at almost any size, seeds are less developed in young fruit, therefore more tender. Using a knife or clippers, cut squash off including some of the stem. By including stem, the fruit is sealed and less likely to mold or dry out. Harvesting Blossoms: Look for male, non-fruit producing flowers that have long stems and harvest just before use (female flowers have a swollen mini-squash at the base of the flower and are on shorter stems).

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Dirani Summer Squash Seeds Reviews

5 reviews
Papusas y Calabacitas
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 20, 2018
Makes great papusas. BI's Calabacitas are also remarkable. Awesome yield.
Dennis Colarelli

My favorite summer squash
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 22, 2018
I love this summer squash. The skin is never bitter and it gives fantastic yields. I have grown it here in California as well as up in the cold north of Idaho.
Frances Sandberg

Mega producing plant
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 14, 2020
I've had excellent results with this squash. I started the plants indoors, planted outside in mid-April. It's mid-June, I've picked 5 good sized zucchini. More are coming in. This plant is in a large raised planter and is doing fine.
Georgianne Messina

Not Impressed
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 14, 2020
This summer squash was sent to me as a substitue for a beautiful heirloom I was wanting to grow along side my work horse, Black Beauty Squash. Seriously poor substitute. I went ahead and planted it to give it a try and have not been happy. Pros - It does grow very quickly and is producing well. Cons- In my garden the taste has been bitter. The skin of this squash is very thin and easily scars. Very plain, pale green. May appeal to some but I was looking for a show stopper and something more unique to contrast my plain, dark green zucch. Very dissappointed.
Stephanie

Dirani summer squash
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jan 12, 2021
so, i garden in phoenix, az. seasons are SHORT. planted at the end of july we got 30-40 % germination, but the plants that sprouted came along gangbusters in an extremely hot summer. we picked our first squash 48 days from planting. they are tasty small , medium, and yes, there is always one that gets away, LARGE! we composted the plant the 3rd week of december, after picking a few more baby squash, frost got it in the end! even under frost cloth. yes, we do get frost in Phoenix! we have planted this in early spring, and get a great harvest into june before the high temperatures and the squash bugs render squash redundant. it is a favorite among all the volunteers who work in the demo garden at he maricopa county cooperative extension office!
Pam Perry

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