Golden Marconi Sweet Pepper

#0064
This packet sows approximately 24 plants when started inside.
Availability: In Stock
This classic Italian pepper is particularly superb roasted. The 6"-10" long, 3" wide peppers start out green and ripen to yellow, becoming very sweet. Extremely flavorful raw, considered by some to be superior to bell peppers. Resistant to potato virus.
$1.89 30 seeds

Botanical Name: Capsicum annuum

Days to Maturity: 80–90 Days from transplanting

Family: Solanaceae

Native: Americas

Hardiness: Frost-sensitive perennial grown as an annual

Plant Dimensions: 24"–36" tall, 18"–24" wide

Variety Information: Up to 10" long, 3" wide peppers start out green and mature to golden yellow.

Attributes: Disease Resistant, Good for Containers

When to Sow Outside: For Mild Climates only: 2 to 4 weeks after average last frost, when soil temperature is at least 70°F.

When to Start Inside: RECOMMENDED. 8 to 10 weeks before transplanting. Ideal soil temperature for germination is 70°–90°F. Transplant seedlings outside 2 to 4 weeks after your average last frost date, and when daytime temperatures are at least 70°F, and nighttime temperatures are at least 55°F. Mild Climates: May be sown in late summer for fall/winter crop.

Days to Emerge: 10–25 Days

Seed Depth: ¼"

Seed Spacing: Start indoors

Row Spacing: 24"–36"

Thinning: Start indoors, plant seedlings 18"–24" apart outside

Harvesting: Peppers can be harvested green, or left on the plant to turn yellow and become sweeter.

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Golden Marconi Sweet Pepper Reviews

1 review
Spring 2019 - Love/Hate in Houston
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 5, 2019
Started these indoors with 100% germination rate and transplanted outside in early March. These plants grew very large (one was 4 ft tall) and produced a lot of peppers. The problems start when the peppers change colour from green to yellow. Once the peppers were about halfway yellow, they developed brown spots and basically rotted on the plant. I managed to harvest a few peppers and these were fantastic, having great flavor. I'm not sure what went wrong with the peppers. It could be that they don't like the hot/humid weather in Houston, there could have been a pest that I couldn't see/wasn't aware of or maybe it was a nutrient deficiency (I doubt this last one as I babied these guys from start to finish). I would definitely recommend these as the problem I experienced may have been with my gardening technique and not the peppers. They were also some of the best tasting peppers I've ever eaten.
Dave C

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