Oriental Blend Oriental Poppy Seeds

Heirloom

#1034
Availability: In Stock
Mix these tall, beautiful poppies with other spring and fall-blooming flowers, and watch your garden come alive with pollinators! One of the hardiest poppies, foliage dies back in the summer heat, then reappears in the fall. Colors include white, orange, pink, and salmon, with black centers.
$1.89 400 mg

Botanical Name: Papaver orientale

Family: Papaveraceae

Native: Asia

Hardiness: Perennial in USDA zones 3–7. Annual, but no less dramatic in USDA zones 7 and warmer.

Plant Dimensions: 24"–48" tall, 12"–36" wide

Variety Information: 4"–8" flowers of orange, pink, red, salmon, and white colors atop hairy stems.

Type: Oriental

Exposure: Full sun

Bloom Period: Late spring to early summer

Attributes: Attracts Pollinators, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED. 4 to 6 weeks before your average last frost date, as soon as soil can be worked, or early to mid-fall for bloom the following spring. Mild Climates: Only fall sowing is recommended.

When to Start Inside: Not recommended. Sow in biodegradable pots for transplanting; roots sensitive to disturbance. 6 to 8 weeks before your average last frost date.

Days to Emerge: 10–15 days

Seed Depth: Press into surface

Seed Spacing: A pinch of seeds every 18"

Thinning: When 2" tall, thin to 1 every 18"

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Oriental Blend Oriental Poppy Seeds Reviews

2 reviews
Again, probably a first-timer mistake
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Aug 28, 2020
Planted along a south-facing fence. Nothing came up. Perhaps wood chip mulch too thick?
Jennifer Bolger
Owner Response: Hi Jennifer, It is a good idea to remove mulch from an area that you want to sow seeds. Mulch is wonderful for helping the soil stay moist and also stifling weed and other seeds as they come up. We sure hope you will try again. Happy gardening!

Still not bloomed
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Oct 4, 2020
October - still not bloomed :( Maybe they will come back next year.
Barbara Roeder
Owner Response: Hi Barbara, Perennials do take longer to mature than annuals which is why a lot of gardeners choose to start them indoors and give them a head start. These poppies have a tap root so if you do choose to start them indoors a biodegradable pot is a good idea as it can be torn away without disturbing the roots too much. Oriental poppies typically bloom in late spring/summer, you can find this information on the front of the seed packet and on this product page, just in case it is helpful in the future. Happy gardening!

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