Roma II Bush Bean Seeds

#0217
This packet sows up to 20 feet.
Availability: In Stock
A favorite in Italy, these flat and wide snap beans aren't available in most grocery stores. Once you taste their delicious nutty flavor you'll wish you could grow them year round. The 4"–5" long pods are slow to develop fiber and seeds so they're nice and tender. 'Roma II' is delicious eaten fresh, and is an excellent variety for freezing or canning. Disease resistant.
$1.99 25 grams

Botanical Name: Phaseolus vulgaris

Days to Maturity: 58 days

Family: Fabaceae

Native: Mexico and South America

Hardiness: Frost-sensitive annual

Plant Dimensions: 15"–20" tall, wide

Variety Information: 4"–5" wide and flat, medium green, stringless pods. Disease resistant to bean common mosaic virus (NY15) and rust.

Type: Snap bean

Attributes: Disease Resistant, Good for Containers

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED. 1 to 2 weeks after your average last frost date, and when soil temperature is at least 65°F, ideally 70°–85°F. Successive Sowings: Every 7 to 14 days up to 80 days before your average first fall frost date. NOTE: In very hot summer areas, skip sowing as high heat approaches; temperatures consistently above 90°F will prevent beans from forming.

When to Start Inside: Not recommended; bean seedlings are sensitive to root disturbance.

Days to Emerge: 6–12 days

Seed Depth: 1"

Seed Spacing: 1 seed every 4"

Row Spacing: 24"

Thinning: Not required

Harvesting: Snap beans are ready to pick when the pod "snaps" or breaks in half cleanly. This is when the seeds have just begun to form and the pods are several inches long (depending on the variety). Hold the stem with one hand, and the pod with the other hand to avoid pulling off branches, which will continue to produce. At season's end, plants are great compost material if they are disease-free.

Because bush beans were developed from pole beans (for condensed and easier harvests), sometimes they can revert to some of the traits of their predecessors by stretching and getting a little lanky before settling into more of a compact bush habit. Thus, why your bush bean appears to be a pole bean.

Bean: Sow and Grow Guide
Edibles for Partial Shade
Write a Review

Roma II Bush Bean Seeds Reviews

2 reviews
Excellent! (beware of mexican bean beetles!)
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Aug 10, 2018
Great yield! I will probably buy two packs next year. These beans are very hard to find. I have only found them in one grocery store in the freezer section. I remember these as a kid when my Italian family used to cook these up in a garlic red sauce! Yum! They are firm and hearty even after cooking. I have just harvested for the 3rd time and they are near the end. We have had a TON of rain and i have noticed the flavor profile weakens a bit BUT don't let that discourage you. They still blanch beautifully for freezing or just a quick saute. I did not treat them for pests because they were doing so well. Now, i know, and i will treat them with diatomaceous earth at a young age to save them from the mexican bean beetle for a hopefully bigger yield. I noticed the bean beetle attacked the plant but the established beans were not affected. I learned a lot about the bean beetle (first thinking it was a lady bug). You will see bright yellow eggs underside the leaf. Then the eggs turn to tiny bright yellow fuzzy caterpillars. The final stage is the shape of a ladybug but a copper coat with two rows of 4 black dots. I think prior to the copper coat they have a pinkish coat. At that stage i REALLY thought they were lady bugs. I will pull the plants out of the ground soon when i know they are done producing. Overall, highly recommend. Great great bean! Looking forward to next year already!!
Lisa S

Good Seeds
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Sep 24, 2019
Good germination and production of beans
Linda Jacobsen

You May Also Like