Kale Dwarf Blue Curled HEIRLOOM Seeds

Kale Dwarf Blue Curled HEIRLOOM Seeds

Brassica oleracea var. sabellica

Item #0130

55 days. Dwarf Blue Curled kale is extremely hardy and will overwinter in all but the coldest climates. Like most greens, grows best in cool weather but will also withstand some heat. Leaves are rich in vitamins and minerals, and low in calories. The flavor of the leaves is sweetened after a light frost. You will really enjoy kale, particularly in winter soups!
This packet sows up to 192 ft.

Days to Emerge:
5-10 days

Seed Depth:
1/4"

Seed Spacing:
A group of 3 seeds every 12"

Row Spacing:
24"

Thinning:
When 1" tall, thin to 1
every 12"


When to sow outside: 1 to 2 weeks before average last frost, when soil temperature is above 45°F for spring/summer crop; late summer for fall crop; and in mild climates, fall for very early spring crop. Successive Sowings: Every 3 weeks starting in early spring until 8 to 10 weeks before average first fall frost.

When to start inside: RECOMMENDED. 4 to 6 weeks before average last frost. For a fall crop, start 8 to 10 weeks before average first fall frost, transplanting after 4 to 6 weeks. Ideal soil temperature for germination is 65°‒85°F.

Harvesting: Outer leaves can be harvested as baby greens when 2"–3" tall, any time when full-sized beginning with the oldest, or the whole plant can be cut off at ground level at maturity. For fast regrowth, harvest up to only 1/3 of the plant at a time.

Artist: Donna Clement

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