Onion Bulb Yellow Sweet Spanish Utah Seeds

Onion Bulb Yellow Sweet Spanish Utah Seeds

Allium cepa var. cepa

Item #0291

Long day. 100 days. The Sweet Spanish onion was grown in the U.S. at least as far back as 1916. Sweet Spanish Utah is from that early type, producing large, 3½"–5" globe-shaped bulbs with amazingly mild, sweet flavor. A long-day variety, it grows best in states north of the 37th parallel. Utah designated this onion the state vegetable in 2002.

This packet sows four 10-foot rows.

Days to Emerge:
7-15 days

Seed Depth:
1/4"

Seed Spacing:
2 seeds every 4"

Mound Spacing:
8"-16"

Thinning:
When 2" tall, thin to 1 every 4"

When to sow outside: 4 to 6 weeks before average last frost or as soon as soil can be worked. Note: Unseasonable cold weather later in the growing season may cause some of the onions to bolt early.

When to start inside: RECOMMENDED. 10 to 12 weeks before average last frost. Transplant outdoors 4 to 6 weeks before the average last frost date. The earlier the start, the bigger/earlier the bulb is produced. Fall planting in mild climates: 8 to 10 weeks before average first fall frost. Transplant outside no later than 6 weeks before average first fall frost.

Harvesting: When onion tops have fallen over and turned yellow or brown, they are ready for harvest. Harvest in the morning, lifting onions with a garden fork. Dry them in the garden in the sun for 2 to 3 days, lightly covering the bulbs with straw, or the tops of other onions to prevent sunscald. Cure onions for 3 to 7 days in a dry area with good air circulation. Once dry, cut the roots to 1/4", and the greens to 1" to create a seal to prevent entrance of decay organisms.

Artist: Annie Reiser



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