Squash Winter Red Kuri Organic HEIRLOOM Seeds

Squash Winter Red Kuri Organic HEIRLOOM Seeds

Cucurbita maxima

Item #3163

95 days. Once you try these teardrop-shaped 3–4 pound fruits, they’ll become an essential part of your fall and winter cooking. “Kuri” is Japanese for chestnut, a tribute to its nutty flavor. Its smooth consistency and deep color make it a favorite for any traditional squash or pumpkin dish, although it's terrific simply sliced, steamed, or baked. Compact 4'–6' vines produce well even in short season climates.

This packet sows 2–3 mounds.

Days to Emerge:
5-10 days

Seed Depth:
1"

Seed Spacing:
A group of 3 seeds per mound

Mound Spacing:
4'-6'

Thinning:
When several leaves appear, thin to 1 – 2 per mound

When to sow outside: RECOMMENDED. 2 to 4 weeks after average last frost, and when soil temperature is above 60°F.

When to start inside: Not recommended except in very short growing seasons, 2 to 4 weeks before average last frost. Sow in paper or pulp pots that can be transplanted directly into the ground.

Harvesting: Harvest just before the first fall frost, when the squash’s rind is hard enough that you can’t dent it with your fingernail. Cut (don’t break the stems off), leaving 2" of stem attached. If stem attachment is broken, the squash will rot in a few weeks. Though fruits are hard and may seem indestructible, treat them gently; a bruised squash spoils quickly.

Artist: Carolyn Crawford

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Squash Winter Red Kuri Organic HEIRLOOM Seeds

$2.99

Item #3163

2.00 grams


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