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Tonda di Parigi Carrot Seeds

Heirloom

#0011
This packet sows up to 33 feet
4.2857142857143 out of 5 stars
(7 reviews)
Availability: In Stock
Small size, but big flavor! 'Tonda di Parigi', Italian for "Round of Paris", is deep orange, sweet and tender, and the round shape is a unique feature among carrots. Shallow roots mean you can grow it in a shallower bed or even in a container!
$1.89 800 mg

Botanical Name: Daucus carota

Days to Maturity: 65 days

Family: Apiaceae

Native: Africa, Eurasia

Hardiness: Frost-tolerant biennial grown as an annual

Plant Dimensions: Roots are 1"–2" long at their peak.

Variety Information: Dark orange, round root, sweet and tender. 'Tonda di Parigi' is a French heirloom in a class of its own; it does not fall into any of the four primary carrot types (Chantenay, Nantes, Danvers, and imperator).

Attributes: Good for Containers , Good for Heavy Soil

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED. 2 to 4 weeks before your average last frost date, and when soil temperature is at least 45°F, ideally 60°–85°F. Successive Sowings: Every 3 weeks until 10 to 12 weeks before your average first fall frost date. In very warm climates, carrots are grown primarily in fall, winter, and spring.

When to Start Inside: Not recommended; root disturbance stunts growth.

Days to Emerge: 10–25 days

Seed Depth: ¼"

Seed Spacing: 1"

Row Spacing: 6"

Thinning: When 1" tall, thin to 1 every 2"

Harvesting: For best flavor and texture, harvest carrots any time before, and until they reach their optimal size. Peak harvest period lasts about 3 weeks, longer in the fall. Late summer-sown carrots are sweetened after having been kissed by light frost; however, harvest before soil freezes, which may destroy the crop. In USDA zone 5 or warmer, carrots can be left in the ground for storage provided they are heavily mulched; harvest as needed on days the ground is not frozen.

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Tonda di Parigi Carrot Seeds Reviews

7 reviews

Great for cooking

4 out of 5 stars Nov 26, 2018
They aren't kidding when they say this is big on flavor! I added these small, two-bite carrots to a roast along with bagged baby carrots we had and while the store-bought carrots completely lost their flavor in the cooking process these kept theirs! They are delicious when cooked, but raw I found them to be soapy tasting and they are hard when bitten into. I grew these in a pot and I can see why kids would get a kick out of their small size. Fun to grow, and can be grown in shallower containers. You could probably grow these inside under grow lights in the winter.
Val from PA

Ssooo cute!

5 out of 5 stars May 22, 2019
Very adorable! Very crunchy!!
Summer Pool from AR

Fab

5 out of 5 stars Jan 16, 2020
I bought these at a local nursery last year. They are fabulous! Now I will buy your seeds directly. I have two golden retrievers, one is a service dog for my husband, so you would suspect they are both well trained. left a few of my harvesting to go indoors to answer the phone. When I returned both of my dogs were eating the carrots, running around and playing keep away from me. They both will not eat vegetables at all! Never. This year I'll have to buy more and move my planting to the large, tall planting box I have. I can't wait to try more of your seeds to plant this year. (Some for me too)
leslie gilford from CA

Cute little carrots

4 out of 5 stars Aug 6, 2020
I'm not sure how big they were supposed to be, but they grew cute, bite sized, bright orange sweet carrots in my very dry raised beds. Definitely will grow again.
Eve Manis from TN

Fun

3 out of 5 stars Oct 4, 2020
Fun small carrot - grew as expected. Tasty too
Barbara Roeder from CO

Tasty carrots

5 out of 5 stars Jan 16, 2021
We grew carrots in a raised bed, so we wanted to try a short variety. Had great germination rate and yield. We were most impressed with the flavor! Would definitely grow again.
Jill from CT

Long to Germinate, Little More Difficult to Grow

4 out of 5 stars Jul 14, 2021
As in the same situation with my rutabaga and radish review, I mistimed the sowing period on these and they suffered the same result of stunted and delayed growth with half of them swelling very little or not at all. A little harder to grow compared to the radishes and rutabagas. Of the ones that did grow, however (so a handful), they tasted very excellent. Will try again this year.
Wes from NM
Owner Response: Hi Wes, Thanks for your feedback. I wanted to address your timing comment. I suspect in your SW location that these were sown in winter or late fall. In the winter, when days near 10 hours of daylight or less you can expect plants to slow, nearly cease growing as they aren't getting as much light for photosynthesis. It would help to plan to have crop 75% matured by the time 10 hour days occur in your area so you can expect they will slow way down until days lengthen again. Our article about overwintering vegetables might be helpful. Happy gardening!