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Moneymaker Pole Tomato Seeds

Moneymaker Pole Tomato Seeds

SKU: #3156

A very popular variety for commercial growers in the 1950s and 1960s, 'Moneymaker' earned its name because of its uniformity and reliably heavy yields. The medium-sized fruits are sweet with a meaty texture, making them versatile for use in fresh or cooked dishes. A good choice for greenhouses as well as outdoors. A favorite of southern gardeners and those in climates with hot, humid summers.

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(~25 seeds)

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  • Variety Info
  • Sowing Info
  • Growing Info
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Variety Info

Days to Maturity: 75 – 80 days from transplanting

Family: Solanaceae

Type: Indeterminate

Native: Andes

Hardiness: Frost-sensitive annual

Exposure: Full sun; at least 6 hours per day. Temperatures above 55°F at night are required for fruit set. Night temperatures above 75°F in the summer inhibit fruit set.

Plant Dimensions: Vines up to 6' or longer

Variety Info: 3½–4 ounce, 2 1/2" globe-shaped fruits. 'Moneymaker' is an indeterminate type tomato.

Sowing Info

When to Sow Outside: For mild climates only: 1 to 2 weeks after your average last frost date, and when soil temperature is at least 60°F.

When to Start Inside: RECOMMENDED. 4 to 6 weeks before transplanting. Transplant when air temperature is 45°F or warmer, usually 1 to 2 weeks after your average last frost date. Ideal soil temperature for germination is 70°‒90°F.

Days to Emerge: 5 – 10 days

Seed Depth: ⅛"

Seed Spacing: A group of 3 seeds every 24" – 36"

Row Spacing: 36"

Thinning: When 2" tall, thin to 1 every 24" – 36"

Growing Info

Harvesting: "Moneymaker' tomatoes are at the peak of sun-ripened deliciousness when they are fully red, and have a slight give when gently squeezed. Tomatoes may also be picked at the “first blush” stage, when 50% of the tomatoes' color has begun to change, and ripened at room temperature without decreasing flavor or nutrition. Picking often and early increases yield, and decreases the risk of cracking and pest damage. Ripe fruit left on the vine during rain or watering is more susceptible to splitting. About 1 month before the average first fall frost, clip all blossoms and undersized fruit off the plant, signaling to the plant to ripen what’s left. Pick any unripe fruit before frost, and store them indoors in a single layer away from direct sunlight to ripen."

Special Care: Do not mulch when weather is still cool; the roots of young plants need to be in soil that is warmed by the sun. When the weather warms up and plants are established, mulch to a depth of 2" or 3" with a material such as straw, leaves, or compost, to conserve moisture, reduce weed growth, and keep the roots warm.