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Tendergreen Mustard Spinach Seeds

Tendergreen Mustard Spinach Seeds

SKU: #0268

This versatile Japanese green is called mustard spinach, spinach mustard, or komatsuna, but it's neither mustard nor spinach! Whatever its name, this delicious, leafy green is milder than other mustards, very easy to grow, and quickly produces flat, smooth, dark, glossy green leaves that can be picked as baby greens or grown to full size. Hardy and productive plants are slow to bolt and tolerate cold, heat, and dry conditions; although best results in cool weather.

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2 grams

(~800 seeds)

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  • Variety Info
  • Sowing Info
  • Growing Info
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Variety Info

Days to Maturity: 30–60 days

Family: Brassicaceae

Native: Probably Eurasia

Hardiness: Frost-tolerant annual

Plant Dimensions: 24" tall, and 16"–24" wide

Variety Info: Smooth dark green, glossy leaves with thin, lighter green midribs and milder flavor than true mustards. Flowers, stalks, and buds are also edible. Slow to bolt and is heat and cold tolerant.

Attributes: Good for Containers, Heat Tolerant

Sowing Info

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED. 4 to 6 weeks before your average last frost date, when soil temperature is at least 40°F, ideally 60°–75°F. Successive Sowings: Every 3 weeks until 10 to 12 weeks before your average first fall frost date for continuous harvest. Mild Climates: Sow in late fall through winter for cool–season harvest.

When to Start Inside: Not recommended; transplant stress can cause plants to bolt (prematurely flower).

Days to Emerge: 5–10 days

Seed Depth: ¼"

Seed Spacing: A group of 3 seeds every 4" – 6"

Row Spacing: 12"–18"

Thinning: When 3" tall, thin to 1 every 4" – 6"

Growing Info

Harvesting: Harvest in the morning if possible. You may start harvesting leaves when they are 2" tall, as needed; remove no more than 1/3 of the plant if regrowth is desired, or let plant grow to maturity and harvest entire plant. Late summer crops will last until the first hard freeze.